UW Campus Canvas

Madison is our campus. And this is our art.

TOPICS: STREET ART|| STREET WEAR
AUTHORS: Gregory | Adam | Becca | Rachel

Today I notice this beautiful, vibrant ‘Temporary Public Art Exhibit’ piece. The location of the artwork is outside Vilas Hall on one of the 4th floor walls. Titled ‘Big Fish’, it is a mixture of contemporary art with an Asian flare. 
Artist: Boram Shin
-Gregory View high resolution

Today I notice this beautiful, vibrant ‘Temporary Public Art Exhibit’ piece. The location of the artwork is outside Vilas Hall on one of the 4th floor walls. Titled ‘Big Fish’, it is a mixture of contemporary art with an Asian flare. 

Artist: Boram Shin

-Gregory

‘Precisely at the point when you begin to develop a conscience you must find yourself at war with your society.’ 
- James Baldwin View high resolution

Precisely at the point when you begin to develop a conscience you must find yourself at war with your society.’

- James Baldwin

Hey readers, I’ve walked past this a couple of times and at first didn’t think much of it, but the more I see it the more unsettling it is. I realize it’s stencil art, but it also makes me think about the idea that an actual gun could’ve been used as the stencil. I know that it’s unlikely, but it’s a very creepy idea. Why did someone put this in a random spot on the concrete? It seems like a simple piece, but it’s also very direct. It instantly portrays violence. Since we’ve been discussing the difference between street art and vandalism recently (and you should certainly tell us how you categorize this in the comments), I thought it would be interesting to consider the motivation for tagging. This seems particularly random, but it still managed to get an emotional response out of me (is “creeped out” an emotional response?). What do you think the motivations behind “random acts of tagging” are? Let us know! - Adam  View high resolution

Hey readers, 

I’ve walked past this a couple of times and at first didn’t think much of it, but the more I see it the more unsettling it is. I realize it’s stencil art, but it also makes me think about the idea that an actual gun could’ve been used as the stencil. I know that it’s unlikely, but it’s a very creepy idea. Why did someone put this in a random spot on the concrete? It seems like a simple piece, but it’s also very direct. It instantly portrays violence. Since we’ve been discussing the difference between street art and vandalism recently (and you should certainly tell us how you categorize this in the comments), I thought it would be interesting to consider the motivation for tagging. This seems particularly random, but it still managed to get an emotional response out of me (is “creeped out” an emotional response?). What do you think the motivations behind “random acts of tagging” are? Let us know! 

- Adam 

Vandalism or Street Art?

What is the difference between street art and vandalism?  According to Merriam-Webster dictionary, vandalism is “willful or malicious destruction or defacement of public or private property”, but isn’t street art simply art created in a public space?  Could these two terms become interchangeable?  When does street art turn into vandalism?

These questions came to my mind when I found this image spray-painted above a door outside of Humanities.  It is not overly complicated and seems like it could have been done in a matter of seconds.  I wonder if it was meant to be artistic or if it was drawn for another reason.  What do you think?  Where is the line drawn between street art and vandalism?

-Rachel

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More Edgy/Girly Mix Perfection

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I know I already posted about how great edgy and girly elements combined in one look are, but I found another example I just had to share! This look combines the edge of black combat boots with very feminine floral print pants and a great semi see-through knit sweater (love the maroon shade) with a classic white bandeau showing underneath. The delicate pendant necklace adds another layer of charm to this outfit with its vintage, girly feel. I’ve been seeing a lot of the bandeau under a semi-sheer shirt look lately and my personal opinion is if it’s done tastefully (like in this case) it can be a great flirty look that is still classy and fashionable. Any thoughts? I’ve also been seeing a ton of floral print pants this season as well and am a huge fan. With spring FINALLY here they seem to fit the season! 

-Becca

Spring is here and summer is just right around the corner. With that said I bring you my friend Becca Bahrke, a sophomore here at UW-Madison majoring in Retail. Becca has her own fashion blog titled “Becca has Nothing to Wear” where she expresses her fashion inspirations as well as posting fashion tips and pictures to show off her own style. One of her favorite seasons is Spring because she it allows her to wear dresses and show off bold colors. Lastly, She left me with these fashion tips for the ladies on campus.

Fashion Do: be bold and take risks, break all fashion rules. Wear white pants, mix patterns, and be you.

Fashion Don’t: Girls, take those oversized bows out of your hair. It’s not game day.

Becca’s Outfit for Today

Sweater -H&M

Denim button down underneath - Urban Outfitters

Pants- Elizabeth & James (Bop)

Necklace - Forever 21 

Shoes- Thrift shop in Paris

Coat- Target

If you want to check out her blog, here is the link: http://beccahasnothingtowear.tumblr.com/

Readers, 
A charming work of art has been defeated today. Unfortunately, local enforcement tends to be unforgiving when it comes to street art. Obviously graffiti is restricted for a reason, such as when crude images taint an otherwise beautiful cityscape. However, in this case, I can’t help but think that the stencil art wasn’t bothering anybody. As someone mentioned in the original post of this piece, street art can be wonderful if it adds to the viewing experience of the beholder. Fortunately, we took a picture of it before it got wiped from existence! That’s the beauty of the internet: everything, however fleeting, can be immortalized in media. It’s true that a picture of original work doesn’t quite meet the quality of the work itself, but it’s a lot better than having nothing left of it. Well, let us know what you think in the comments; was this an eyesore that was thankfully removed? Or are you sad to see street art like this go? - Adam View high resolution

Readers, 

A charming work of art has been defeated today. Unfortunately, local enforcement tends to be unforgiving when it comes to street art. Obviously graffiti is restricted for a reason, such as when crude images taint an otherwise beautiful cityscape. However, in this case, I can’t help but think that the stencil art wasn’t bothering anybody. As someone mentioned in the original post of this piece, street art can be wonderful if it adds to the viewing experience of the beholder. 

Fortunately, we took a picture of it before it got wiped from existence! That’s the beauty of the internet: everything, however fleeting, can be immortalized in media. It’s true that a picture of original work doesn’t quite meet the quality of the work itself, but it’s a lot better than having nothing left of it. Well, let us know what you think in the comments; was this an eyesore that was thankfully removed? Or are you sad to see street art like this go? 

- Adam

I found this bright piece of spray-painted art on the Humanities building.  It almost looks like a horse and a lion.  I wonder what it represents?  Does anyone know what it means?  It was hidden in a little alleyway and it was small, so it was hard to notice.  I found it interesting that the picture was painted a bright pink, yet, it was in a place that many people would not usually walk past.  Another thing I noticed was that it was spray-painted, making it more permanent than a normal chalk drawing.  Once again, the issue of placement comes up.  If this bright, spray-painted image was supposed to be noticed, why is it in such a private location?  What do you think about this image?  Have you ever seen it before? View high resolution

I found this bright piece of spray-painted art on the Humanities building.  It almost looks like a horse and a lion.  I wonder what it represents?  Does anyone know what it means?  It was hidden in a little alleyway and it was small, so it was hard to notice.  I found it interesting that the picture was painted a bright pink, yet, it was in a place that many people would not usually walk past.  Another thing I noticed was that it was spray-painted, making it more permanent than a normal chalk drawing.  Once again, the issue of placement comes up.  If this bright, spray-painted image was supposed to be noticed, why is it in such a private location?  What do you think about this image?  Have you ever seen it before?

Birkenstocks: Fashion “do” or “don’t”?

As spring approaches here in Madison I’ve been noticing more and more people breaking out their Birkenstock sandals. These sandals cover the streets of Madison once the weather is nice, and their appeal has intrigued me for some time now. I am the proud owner of a pair myself, and am obsessed with how comfortable and functional they are. However, the question here is of style: can Birkies be fashionable or are they just a functional but boring eye sore? Tell me what you think and send us a stylish picture of you and your Birkies- I’ll post the most fashionable pic next week! 

Send pictures to: uwcampuscanvas@gmail.com

-Becca 

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My Birkenstock clad feet bringing the Midwest fad to the streets of L.A. 

This week I wanted to address something different than the “street art” we usually post on UW Campus Canvas; Sticker Art. Sticker art is just another form of street art using stickers to convey a message. It is also known as sticker bombing, sticker slapping, slap tagging, and sticker tagging. This style of street art uses some form of sticker in which an image or message is publicly displayed using stickers. The sticker art can be located anywhere reachable outside, around cites and towns. The reason some street artists use this form of art instead of using paint is because stickers have a much lower risk of apprehension by officials enforcing anti–vandalism laws. Plus stickers are easier to place anywhere in seconds without consuming time to design. So I went around Madison looking for sticker street art and this is what I found.